Submarine Defence at Cramond Island- Edinburgh Scotland


Posted: , Last update: May 16 2016, in Bunkers, Fortresses & Strongpoints. 3 comments

Submarine defence and Causeway

Submarine defence and Causeway

Cramond Island

Near the town of Cramond in Scotand is the tidal Cramond island. The island ins’t too big, its about 600 meters long and maybe half as wide. During World War Two the entrance towards the river Almond was protected with a submarine defense wall and gun emplacements on the island.

Cramond Island submarine defence 1,6 km long

Cramond Island submarine defence 1,6 km long

Concrete Pylons at Cramond Island

Concrete Pylons at Cramond Island

Concrete pylon at the Cramond Causeway

Concrete pylon at the Cramond Causeway

Gun and Searchlight emplacement ont he south of Cramond Island

Gun and Searchlight emplacement ont he south of Cramond Island

All islands near Edinburg were fortified like Cramond Island against ships and submarines. On the island are multiple gun emplacements, for a 75mm gun in the south and a range of calibres in the north, searchlight building to illuminate targets for the guns. There are ammunition storages, shelters and two engine rooms that powered all the military installations on Cramond Island. There used to be barracks as well but they collapsed over time.  These Baracks housed a garrison which was stationed at the island. The submarine wall has a causeway to it, it connects Cramond Island to the main land, to the village of Cramond and has a length of 1,6 kilometres.

Buildings at the North end of Cramond Island

Buildings at the North end of Cramond Island

Inside the Northern buildings

Inside the Northern buildings

Fortified window at Cramond Island

Fortified window at Cramond Island

Gun emplacement at the northern end of Cramond Island

Gun emplacement at the northern end of Cramond Island

Submarine defence on Cramond Island

Submarine defence on Cramond Island

A mile out in the sea you can see Inchmickery Island which is totally covered with military buildings.

The Fortified Island of Inchmickery seen from Cramond Island

The Fortified Island of Inchmickery seen from Cramond Island

Visit

Cramond Island is free to visit and always open. The only restriction is the sea and its tide. Make sure you have enough time left when you visit the island with low tide, you do not want to be stuck on the island when high tide is coming up. You would not be the first who got back to the main land with wet clothes or had to wait for hours on low tide.

Submarine defence seen from Cramond Island

Submarine defence seen from Cramond Island

Al photos are provided by Phil Wood





3 thoughts on “Submarine Defence at Cramond Island- Edinburgh Scotland

  1. Hi. The concrete boom linking Cramond Island with the mainland was to stop small surface craft, not submarines. The water is too shallow for a submarine to pass, even if it was on the surface. The anti-submarine defences, in the form of floating nets, ran from the north side of Cramond Island, to Inchcolm, and then to Charles Hill on the Fife shore. There are more concrete anti-boat pillars at Charles Hill, from the First World War, but re-used in the Second.

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